04 Oct

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Halloween Fundraiser Dance

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Due to popular demand…the Halloween Dance is BACK!

Don’t Miss It!

New location for the much anticipated dance is The Royal Canadian Legion in Stouffville. For you convenience a shuttle will be running from Cedar Beach.

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Halloween Dance Bus Shuttle – from Musselman’s Lake to The Legion (Sat Oct 29, 2016)

$10 per person round trip

Pick up location:  Cedar Beach Resort Pavillion – 155 Cedarvale Blvd (8:45pm, 9:15pm, 9:45pm, 10:15pm)

Pick up location: The Legion – Stouffville – 150 Mostar Street (drive back to the Lake at 12:00am, 12:30am, 1:00am, 1:30am)

Contact Info

Call or email Lisa Gallagher-White for wristbands/payment (CASH only)
lisagwhite@rogers.com;  cell 647-205-8192

Photo Gallery

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Filed Under: Events, MLRA News

26 Aug

Comments Off on Back To School Safety

Back To School Safety

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CAA’s Safety Tips for Back-To-School

 

Start the school year off right with these safety tips from CAA

CAA – Canadian Automobile Association

A boy wearing glasses sits in front of a chalkboard with the words Back to school written on itThe smell of freshly sharpened pencils and just opened packages of loose leaf paper will soon be filling the air as students gear up to go back to school. While new supplies and old friends may be the focus for your child, it’s important to make sure they start the year off safely by reviewing these important tips before the first day of classes rolls around.

Route Reminders

Children walking or biking to school need to be familiar with the route they will be taking. Choose a direct route away from busy streets, and make sure you practice the route with them a few times before school starts to make sure they’re comfortable. Make sure they have a travel buddy – a friend, sibling or neighbour – so they aren’t making the journey alone.

Mind Your Step

Remind children to pay attention to their surroundings when walking or biking. That means no texting while walking or bilking, and leaving headphones in their backpacks so they can hear what’s going on around them. Review traffic safety and remind your child to wait at crosswalks and to look both ways before crossing the street!

Stranger Danger

Make sure your child knows not to talk to strangers and never to get in a vehicle with someone they don’t know, no matter what they say. Tell them not to venture away from school grounds and to tell a teacher or another adult they know right away if an adult they don’t know tries to talk them into leaving with them.

School Bus Safety

Discuss school bus safety with your child and remind them how important it is to stay seated for the entire trip. Make sure they know to never walk in front of the bus unless the driver has indicated it is safe to do so.

Backpack Basics

Check your child’s backpack to make sure it fits them properly and isn’t too heavy. Backpacks can cause back issues and falls if they aren’t adjusted properly or are too heavy.

Tell an Adult

Discuss bullying with your child and work with them to develop effective coping strategies, Make sure they know not to give in to a bully’s demands or retaliate, but to say stop, walk away and tell an adult.

CAA – Canadian Automobile Association

 

05 Aug

Comments Off on Cedar Beach Resort opens activity program up to the community

Cedar Beach Resort opens activity program up to the community

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Yoga, Line Dancing and Pilates are just a few of the activities being offered to the community.

Community Activities logo1 (320x222)  Lisa who is the new recreation director at Cedar Beach is happy to be offering the community of Musselman’s Lake a selection of classes that are being held at the Cedar Beach Resort Pavilion. Classes will be held throughout the summer up until the Thanksgiving weekend.

The Recreation Centre (Pavilion/ Dance Hall) has a newly renovate space that occupies half of the hall for exercise classes.

A ’10-Class Family Pass’ that you can share with other family members as well as choose any classes is only $75.oo

A great initiative has been started to engage local teenagers that wish to earn their ‘ Community Credits’ for High School. A ‘Creativity4 Credits’ allows local youth to help our local community every Thursday at 3pm. (see schedule)

If you wish to register, please arrive 10 mins before the class you wish to attend.
Contact Lisa at: lisa@yogayama.ca

Community Activities_August timetable

 

04 Aug

Comments Off on Ninth Line Landfill Site/Restoration Project Update re Amendment

Ninth Line Landfill Site/Restoration Project Update re Amendment

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Amendment to Site Alteration & Fill Management Plan Amendment for Small Quantities/Hydro-excavation Fill

Lee Sand & Gravel Pit site circa 1950 prior to excavations

Lee Sand & Gravel Pit site circa 1950 prior to excavations

Further the Town Public Meeting on  June 23, 2016 and/or the June 30, 2016 Open House hosted by United Soils Management at the site at 14245 Ninth Line

Q and A re Amendment to Site Alteration & Fill Management Plan 22jul16

 

Related Links

Ninth Line Landfill Site/Restoration Project Update

Annual Open House at United Soils

TOWN COUNCIL’S DECISION BENEFITS OUR COMMUNITY

GRAVEL PIT RESTORATION PERMIT

A Very Informative Meeting

Gold Standard For All Ontario

A Game Changer Interview

Lee Sand & Gravel Restoration Project Sets A New Standard (part two of three parts)

Lee Sand & Gravel Restoration Project Sets A New Standard (final part of three part interview with the MLRA)

 

05 Jul

Comments Off on Musselman’s Lake’s Official Unofficial Flower

Musselman’s Lake’s Official Unofficial Flower

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If you live at Musselman’s Lake you are used to seeing the many Lilies that are abundant in our community.

By Charlene Jones (Originally posted July 2014)

Two kinds of brilliant orange, strikingly tall lilies can be identified around our lake. They both bear the name “Ditch Lily” from their shared preference for growing around ditches.

The first variety, called Common Wildflower Lily, or Day Lily is not really a lily at all. It belongs to the Latin group Hemerocallidaceae and if you can pronounce that, come over and teach me, too!

Musselman's Lake Tiger Lilly

Musselman’s Lake Lily in bloom

These plants are nearly indestructible. If you have an area in need of strong, I mean really strong, roots, such as a hill, or part of your garden where other kinds of foliage fail, try the Common Wildflower Lily.You will notice it growing in large clumps, dotting the roads and by ways with its plain orange blossom. The single blossom, on top of a long, woody stalk with many buds, but only a single blossom, lasts one day and has no scent. These blossoms with their trumpet shape and striking color are known to attract hummingbirds. Dig down in spring or fall where you find these flowers growing wild, wash and transplant, covering their roots with enough soil to keep them dark, then watering fully. They like company and enjoy being planted together, much closer than many other flowers like. But beware. The roots on this plant grow thickly and will not be easily disturbed. For more on this google Ditch Lilies and read laments from many who have tried to release their soil from the clutches of this determined plant!

The other variety is called Oriental Lily. This is the true Tiger Lily although it too is called Day Lily. If you think the names are confusing so far, consider this: Tiger Lilies do not have stripes. They have spots and so are sometimes referred to as Leopard Lilies!

Tiger Lilies bloom orange or reddish orange with dark brown speckles covering the petals. The petals curve backwards and the bloom faces downward. The blooms form in clusters where several bloom at one time resting on the tip of a heavy stalk that is covered with short spiky leaves. This kind laces the garden air with the smell of lily, lily, lily. Their reddish tinge and brown speckles no doubt gave rise to the superstition that if you smell a Tiger Lily, you will receive freckles!

These lilies need more gentle handling in the beginning. The Oriental Variety require you to separate small bulbs called bulbits from the axils of leaves of a thriving plant. Remove the bulb scales from the bulbits and grow them in moist peat, in a cool, dark place until small bulbs form. Start them in a nursery and later transfer them outside. Once the Oriental Variety are established and thriving, theyʼll drop their own bulbs with no help from you.Caution

Tiger Lillies blooming this week in a Musselman's Lake backyard

Lilies blooming this week in a Musselman’s Lake backyard

Although both Oriental and Common WIldflower Lilies are extremely hardy and seldom suffer from insects or disease themselves, both may carry diseases that affect other lilies and flowering plants, so if you are going to transplant from a wild group, you might consider carefully washing their roots before bedding them in your soil.

These plants are also toxic to cats, who may vomit, demonstrate lethargy, even develop kidney failure from eating them. On the other hand, rabbits and deer find the orange flowers a delectable treat! To keep these wild animals from eating away at your prizes, or nibbling on other treats from your garden, try mixing a solution of 20% egg with about 80% water, and spraying this over your lilies. Deer and rabbits hate the smell of eggs!

 

05 Jul

Comments Off on Nature’s Way of Leveling the Playing Field

Nature’s Way of Leveling the Playing Field

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From the Reader’s Write section of the Stouffville Free Press

These periodic die-offs may be nature’s way of leveling the playing field.

In the last couple of weeks Musselman’s Lake has experienced a fish die-off similar, but less severe in numbers, to what occurred in the spring of 2009.

There are a number of similarities between this fish die-off and that of 2009. As in 2009 the dying fish are almost exclusively black crappie, as well, both incidences occurred in the early spring when the Crappie are breeding.

Sunfish nesting in Musselman's Lake.

Sunfish nesting in Musselman’s Lake. Photo Dr. Brian Laing

Sunfish, a close relative, are seen mating and nesting as I write this. A water quality issue would affect more than one species of fish.

All of this leads us to believe that the crappie die-off that we have just experienced is caused by the same thing that caused it in 2009, namely, the unusually warm weather followed by a drop in temperature timed just when the crappie are breeding. This theory is further supported by the fact that almost all of the fish are of breeding size, the young fry are not affected.

If the Crappie were not spawning they would have stayed in the deeper cooler water and not been subjected to the water temperature fluctuations. As it is, the breeding fish stay in the shallow water and are stressed becoming prone to a bacterial infection by Columnaris flexibacter.

Columnaris is always present in fish, but typically becomes an issue only in stressed fish.

Postmortems in 2009 confirmed this as the cause at that time. Due to the similarities of the two die-offs, we have not performed postmortems this year, but are confident that the cause of the two incidents is the same.

There is potential ‘silver lining’ to this crappie die-off. Crappie are an aggressive species recently introduced to the lake (likely through release of baitfish). I have seen their young surround a sunfish nest and slowly eat all the eggs. As the male sunfish chases off one juvenile crappie another moves in and eats some eggs. The sunfish returns to the nest and chases off the new interloper while a third rushes in to eat some more eggs. In very little time the sunfish nest is empty.

Because of survival instincts like this, the crappie population has dramatically increased since they were introduced to the lake and is putting pressure on other species.

These periodic die-offs may be nature’s way of leveling the playing field.

Dr Brian Laing

MLRA

Town and Country Animal Hospital

905-640-4107

 

 

Related Links

Natural Occurrence and No Cause For Alarm

Update of the Crappie Die-Off

Phil Bannon Mounts A Cleanup

Crappie Update

It’s Crappie!