Tagged: Charlene Jones

12 Jul

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Musselman’s Unofficial Official Flower

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If you live at Musselman’s Lake you are used to seeing the many Lilies that are abundant in our community.

By Charlene Jones (Originally posted July 2014)

Two kinds of brilliant orange, strikingly tall lilies can be identified around our lake. They both bear the name “Ditch Lily” from their shared preference for growing around ditches.

The first variety, called Common Wildflower Lily, or Day Lily is not really a lily at all. It belongs to the Latin group Hemerocallidaceae and if you can pronounce that, come over and teach me, too!

Musselman's Lake Tiger Lilly

Musselman’s Lake Lily in bloom

These plants are nearly indestructible. If you have an area in need of strong, I mean really strong, roots, such as a hill, or part of your garden where other kinds of foliage fail, try the Common Wildflower Lily.You will notice it growing in large clumps, dotting the roads and by ways with its plain orange blossom. The single blossom, on top of a long, woody stalk with many buds, but only a single blossom, lasts one day and has no scent. These blossoms with their trumpet shape and striking color are known to attract hummingbirds. Dig down in spring or fall where you find these flowers growing wild, wash and transplant, covering their roots with enough soil to keep them dark, then watering fully. They like company and enjoy being planted together, much closer than many other flowers like. But beware. The roots on this plant grow thickly and will not be easily disturbed. For more on this google Ditch Lilies and read laments from many who have tried to release their soil from the clutches of this determined plant!

The other variety is called Oriental Lily. This is the true Tiger Lily although it too is called Day Lily. If you think the names are confusing so far, consider this: Tiger Lilies do not have stripes. They have spots and so are sometimes referred to as Leopard Lilies!

Tiger Lilies bloom orange or reddish orange with dark brown speckles covering the petals. The petals curve backwards and the bloom faces downward. The blooms form in clusters where several bloom at one time resting on the tip of a heavy stalk that is covered with short spiky leaves. This kind laces the garden air with the smell of lily, lily, lily. Their reddish tinge and brown speckles no doubt gave rise to the superstition that if you smell a Tiger Lily, you will receive freckles!

These lilies need more gentle handling in the beginning. The Oriental Variety require you to separate small bulbs called bulbits from the axils of leaves of a thriving plant. Remove the bulb scales from the bulbits and grow them in moist peat, in a cool, dark place until small bulbs form. Start them in a nursery and later transfer them outside. Once the Oriental Variety are established and thriving, theyʼll drop their own bulbs with no help from you.Caution

Tiger Lillies blooming this week in a Musselman's Lake backyard

Lilies blooming this week in a Musselman’s Lake backyard

Although both Oriental and Common WIldflower Lilies are extremely hardy and seldom suffer from insects or disease themselves, both may carry diseases that affect other lilies and flowering plants, so if you are going to transplant from a wild group, you might consider carefully washing their roots before bedding them in your soil.

These plants are also toxic to cats, who may vomit, demonstrate lethargy, even develop kidney failure from eating them. On the other hand, rabbits and deer find the orange flowers a delectable treat! To keep these wild animals from eating away at your prizes, or nibbling on other treats from your garden, try mixing a solution of 20% egg with about 80% water, and spraying this over your lilies. Deer and rabbits hate the smell of eggs!

 

23 Jun

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A Legacy Community Park

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A Long Time Coming: Coultice Park a Reality

By Charlene Jones

Coultice Park Musselman’s Lake. Stouffville Review website photo

The past met the present and predicted the future on Saturday June 17th at the former Wagon Wheel Ranch on Ninth Line. Many faces reflecting our community gathered to witness the ribbon cutting ceremony, the grand opening of Coultice Park. These faces showed the history of our area, and as one person said “This park has been in the works at least 15 years.”

Coultice Family at the Coultice Park Opening June 17, 2017. Maurice Smith website photo.

Councillor Maurice Smith spoke to the same theme, beginning and ending his short talk with the words “It has been a long time coming.”

Natalie Coultice-Matthews description of her father’s past, his beginnings as a chicken farmer, his short stint as chinchilla farmer and his destiny as horse ranch owner created waves of sympathy from the crowd.  It was Jim Coultice’s vision to leave a legacy for the future.

Looking around at children exploring the gym equipment, teenagers sauntering in small packs through the crowd, the parents, grandparents and elders of our community for whom this park has been a dream it is clear: Jim Coultice’s vision has left us all richer by far.

It’s a gift that will keep giving for a long time coming.

05 Jul

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Musselman’s Lake’s Official Unofficial Flower

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If you live at Musselman’s Lake you are used to seeing the many Lilies that are abundant in our community.

By Charlene Jones (Originally posted July 2014)

Two kinds of brilliant orange, strikingly tall lilies can be identified around our lake. They both bear the name “Ditch Lily” from their shared preference for growing around ditches.

The first variety, called Common Wildflower Lily, or Day Lily is not really a lily at all. It belongs to the Latin group Hemerocallidaceae and if you can pronounce that, come over and teach me, too!

Musselman's Lake Tiger Lilly

Musselman’s Lake Lily in bloom

These plants are nearly indestructible. If you have an area in need of strong, I mean really strong, roots, such as a hill, or part of your garden where other kinds of foliage fail, try the Common Wildflower Lily.You will notice it growing in large clumps, dotting the roads and by ways with its plain orange blossom. The single blossom, on top of a long, woody stalk with many buds, but only a single blossom, lasts one day and has no scent. These blossoms with their trumpet shape and striking color are known to attract hummingbirds. Dig down in spring or fall where you find these flowers growing wild, wash and transplant, covering their roots with enough soil to keep them dark, then watering fully. They like company and enjoy being planted together, much closer than many other flowers like. But beware. The roots on this plant grow thickly and will not be easily disturbed. For more on this google Ditch Lilies and read laments from many who have tried to release their soil from the clutches of this determined plant!

The other variety is called Oriental Lily. This is the true Tiger Lily although it too is called Day Lily. If you think the names are confusing so far, consider this: Tiger Lilies do not have stripes. They have spots and so are sometimes referred to as Leopard Lilies!

Tiger Lilies bloom orange or reddish orange with dark brown speckles covering the petals. The petals curve backwards and the bloom faces downward. The blooms form in clusters where several bloom at one time resting on the tip of a heavy stalk that is covered with short spiky leaves. This kind laces the garden air with the smell of lily, lily, lily. Their reddish tinge and brown speckles no doubt gave rise to the superstition that if you smell a Tiger Lily, you will receive freckles!

These lilies need more gentle handling in the beginning. The Oriental Variety require you to separate small bulbs called bulbits from the axils of leaves of a thriving plant. Remove the bulb scales from the bulbits and grow them in moist peat, in a cool, dark place until small bulbs form. Start them in a nursery and later transfer them outside. Once the Oriental Variety are established and thriving, theyʼll drop their own bulbs with no help from you.Caution

Tiger Lillies blooming this week in a Musselman's Lake backyard

Lilies blooming this week in a Musselman’s Lake backyard

Although both Oriental and Common WIldflower Lilies are extremely hardy and seldom suffer from insects or disease themselves, both may carry diseases that affect other lilies and flowering plants, so if you are going to transplant from a wild group, you might consider carefully washing their roots before bedding them in your soil.

These plants are also toxic to cats, who may vomit, demonstrate lethargy, even develop kidney failure from eating them. On the other hand, rabbits and deer find the orange flowers a delectable treat! To keep these wild animals from eating away at your prizes, or nibbling on other treats from your garden, try mixing a solution of 20% egg with about 80% water, and spraying this over your lilies. Deer and rabbits hate the smell of eggs!

 

11 Sep

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What A Splendid Display

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What a splendid display of fireworks!

pic06

Labour Day Fireworks at Cedar Beach, Musselman’s Lake

By Charlene Jones

Who gets to sit on their dock and watch a powerful display of fireworks in the air and the water? We do.

Friends joined us from Claremont and Whitby to share in this, one of the many extraordinary moments supplied by living on Musselman’s Lake.

Thanks go out from our hearts to the owner/operators of Cedar Beach and to the talents of Pyromaniacs for putting on this celebration of the last of summer, the first of fall.

Thank You!

 

Related Link
What a BLAST! Cedar Beach Annual Fireworks Display

07 Aug

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Community Leader On The Move

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by Charlene Jones

We will miss the Gilderdale’s and all they have done to enrich our lives here in the small burb

Kate Gilderdale, editor of the Stouffville Free Press, tours Musselman’s Lake

Kate Gilderdale tours Musselman’s Lake

Communities develop profile through the people who live in them. In this sense, we in the greater Whitchurch Stouffville area are less than who we collectively were, for the recent move of Ms. Kate Gilderdale and Dermot (aka Mr. Wallethead) to the bustle of downtown Toronto.

Yes, we wish them well. Yes, we genuinely hope in our hearts they find sympatico and good wine in every corner of their new digs. And yes, somewhere deep down we miss them and regret their move, for our own sake.

Kate’s decision to stay on with Free Press when it grew from its previous incarnation was motivated largely by her commitment to positive news, the kind of intelligent news and reporting that lets a community see itself in the best light. By focusing on that best light the Free Press under Kate’s editorial eagle eye supported our sense that we in Whitchurch-Stouffville have blessed and prosperous neighborhoods, enjoy friendly exchanges with most everyone, even those with whom we disagree, and thrive under the generosity of one person to the other. This light surely sustains one in the darker moments of any life! We extend our best wishes to Mr. Bruce Stapely who has stepped up to fill in as editor of the Free Press.

Kate is also the moving force behind Starlight Cinema at 19 on the Park, a project she undertook with characteristic determination and quiet refusal to be acknowledged!

As a personal friend, Kate offers many qualities I admire. Perhaps first among the many is her outstanding wit. As a British native she often seems disinclined to understand how unique her wit is and how much joy it brings to all situations. But then, that’s another of Kate’s great personal qualities: her humility. The first to crow about others, to admire the talents and abilities of those around her Kate’s natural attention lay on the goodness in other people. We will miss the Gilderdale’s and all they have done to enrich our lives here in the small ‘burb; we wish Kate every moment of well deserved fulfillment in her newest role as Grandmama!

Kate Gilderdale has now ventured into the Toronto reading scene by making an appearance at Vino Rosso, 995 Bay St. Toronto on August 1st.  She did Stouffville up proud as she read from her great humorous columns to an appreciative crowd. Spontaneous clapping and laughter followed her words as she tickled and entertained all present with her gift of self-deprecating humour. Rumour has it that she has been asked back for a return engagement.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

The Gilderdales’ Last Gasp

BY  ON ARTICLESVINTAGE WHINE

The Gilderdales’ Last Gasp
By Kate Gilderdale

Vintage-Whine-pic-702x336@2xLike Frank Sinatra’s long goodbye, the Walletheads’ farewell to Stouffville was a protracted affair, which included an unforgettable celebration hosted by the Free Press and other lovely FOGs (Friends of the Gilderdales).
Tuning out the rising panic associated with moving after four decades in one spot, we also rashly decided to hold a ‘goodbye to the house’ party at the old homestead for family and friends from the city who had been regular visitors to the ’ville over the years.
The event was scheduled for nine days before the big move and several people questioned our sanity. It would be a breeze, I insisted. We’d order in and everything else would take care of itself.
By the time I had begun to think rationally about the affair it was too late to cancel, so I turned to my stalwart friend Lynn for advice about what to serve. “Funeral sandwiches,” she said, without missing a beat.
I pointed out that even though I’m sort of retiring, I’m not ready to throw in the towel completely, but apparently the name is often used to describe food which is easy to serve. Our old friend, Wikipedia, explains it thus:
“The common thread among funeral food is that it is typically simple, warm and versatile, which could explain where funeral sandwiches got their name.”
Another site, cleverhousewife.com, offered recipes for these delicacies under the snappy little header, ‘Nothing to mourn about here’. Of course, even I wasn’t deranged enough to think I’d have time to make them myself, so I ordered from a caterer and asked my daughter to collect them on the big day.
As the party approached I became more and more convinced that we would need other stuff to offset the funereal fare, so I picked up dips, chips, cheese straws, nuts, olives and a slew of other ‘just in case’ substitutes.
“I’ll just put them out on serving plates or in bowls,” I said blithely to Mr. Wallethead, momentarily forgetting that all the serving plates and bowls were triple wrapped, boxed and stashed in the garage awaiting their journey to a new life in the city.
As it turned out, both our farewell celebrations did have one element common to a funeral – it was like being at your own wake. People said lovely things about what we meant to them and how much they would miss us; my esteemed editor and two co-conspirators wrote and sang a brilliant and witty version of My Way, re-titled Kate’s Way; and one long-time friend created a poster for guests to sign at the house party (see photo).
In the months leading up to the final bash, we had been madly divesting ourselves of four decades worth of junk, magazines, paperbacks, broken furniture, paint cans and chipped mugs dating back to the last millennium.
When the party was over, we had amassed another mountain of recyclable containers, cups and plates, which will necessitate a final farewell trip to the dump before we set out on what we hope will be Kate and Dermont’s Excellent Adventure.
By the time you read this, we will be in our apartment, surrounded by boxes, bedding and books, and wondering where on earth we put the corkscrew.

09 Jul

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Lake’s Official Unofficial Flower

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If you live at Musselman’s Lake you are used to seeing the many Lilies that are abundant in our community.

By Charlene Jones (Originally posted July 2014)

Two kinds of brilliant orange, strikingly tall lilies can be identified around our lake. They both bear the name “Ditch Lily” from their shared preference for growing around ditches.

The first variety, called Common Wildflower Lily, or Day Lily is not really a lily at all. It belongs to the Latin group Hemerocallidaceae and if you can pronounce that, come over and teach me, too!

Musselman's Lake Tiger Lilly

Musselman’s Lake Lily in bloom

These plants are nearly indestructible. If you have an area in need of strong, I mean really strong, roots, such as a hill, or part of your garden where other kinds of foliage fail, try the Common Wildflower Lily.You will notice it growing in large clumps, dotting the roads and by ways with its plain orange blossom. The single blossom, on top of a long, woody stalk with many buds, but only a single blossom, lasts one day and has no scent. These blossoms with their trumpet shape and striking color are known to attract hummingbirds. Dig down in spring or fall where you find these flowers growing wild, wash and transplant, covering their roots with enough soil to keep them dark, then watering fully. They like company and enjoy being planted together, much closer than many other flowers like. But beware. The roots on this plant grow thickly and will not be easily disturbed. For more on this google Ditch Lilies and read laments from many who have tried to release their soil from the clutches of this determined plant!

The other variety is called Oriental Lily. This is the true Tiger Lily although it too is called Day Lily. If you think the names are confusing so far, consider this: Tiger Lilies do not have stripes. They have spots and so are sometimes referred to as Leopard Lilies!

Tiger Lilies bloom orange or reddish orange with dark brown speckles covering the petals. The petals curve backwards and the bloom faces downward. The blooms form in clusters where several bloom at one time resting on the tip of a heavy stalk that is covered with short spiky leaves. This kind laces the garden air with the smell of lily, lily, lily. Their reddish tinge and brown speckles no doubt gave rise to the superstition that if you smell a Tiger Lily, you will receive freckles!

These lilies need more gentle handling in the beginning. The Oriental Variety require you to separate small bulbs called bulbits from the axils of leaves of a thriving plant. Remove the bulb scales from the bulbits and grow them in moist peat, in a cool, dark place until small bulbs form. Start them in a nursery and later transfer them outside. Once the Oriental Variety are established and thriving, theyʼll drop their own bulbs with no help from you.Caution

Tiger Lillies blooming this week in a Musselman's Lake backyard

Lilies blooming this week in a Musselman’s Lake backyard

Although both Oriental and Common WIldflower Lilies are extremely hardy and seldom suffer from insects or disease themselves, both may carry diseases that affect other lilies and flowering plants, so if you are going to transplant from a wild group, you might consider carefully washing their roots before bedding them in your soil.

These plants are also toxic to cats, who may vomit, demonstrate lethargy, even develop kidney failure from eating them. On the other hand, rabbits and deer find the orange flowers a delectable treat! To keep these wild animals from eating away at your prizes, or nibbling on other treats from your garden, try mixing a solution of 20% egg with about 80% water, and spraying this over your lilies. Deer and rabbits hate the smell of eggs!

 

10 Jul

Comments Off on Lake’s Official Unofficial Flower

Lake’s Official Unofficial Flower

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If you live at Musselman’s Lake you are used to seeing the many Lilies that are abundant in our community.

By Charlene Jones

Two kinds of brilliant orange, strikingly tall lilies can be identified around our lake. They both bear the name “Ditch Lily” from their shared preference for growing around ditches.

The first variety, called Common Wildflower Lily, or Day Lily is not really a lily at all. It belongs to the Latin group Hemerocallidaceae and if you can pronounce that, come over and teach me, too!

Musselman's Lake Tiger Lilly

Musselman’s Lake Lily in bloom

These plants are nearly indestructible. If you have an area in need of strong, I mean really strong, roots, such as a hill, or part of your garden where other kinds of foliage fail, try the Common Wildflower Lily.You will notice it growing in large clumps, dotting the roads and by ways with its plain orange blossom. The single blossom, on top of a long, woody stalk with many buds, but only a single blossom, lasts one day and has no scent. These blossoms with their trumpet shape and striking color are known to attract hummingbirds. Dig down in spring or fall where you find these flowers growing wild, wash and transplant, covering their roots with enough soil to keep them dark, then watering fully. They like company and enjoy being planted together, much closer than many other flowers like. But beware. The roots on this plant grow thickly and will not be easily disturbed. For more on this google Ditch Lilies and read laments from many who have tried to release their soil from the clutches of this determined plant!

The other variety is called Oriental Lily. This is the true Tiger Lily although it too is called Day Lily. If you think the names are confusing so far, consider this: Tiger Lilies do not have stripes. They have spots and so are sometimes referred to as Leopard Lilies!

Tiger Lilies bloom orange or reddish orange with dark brown speckles covering the petals. The petals curve backwards and the bloom faces downward. The blooms form in clusters where several bloom at one time resting on the tip of a heavy stalk that is covered with short spiky leaves. This kind laces the garden air with the smell of lily, lily, lily. Their reddish tinge and brown speckles no doubt gave rise to the superstition that if you smell a Tiger Lily, you will receive freckles!

These lilies need more gentle handling in the beginning. The Oriental Variety require you to separate small bulbs called bulbits from the axils of leaves of a thriving plant. Remove the bulb scales from the bulbits and grow them in moist peat, in a cool, dark place until small bulbs form. Start them in a nursery and later transfer them outside. Once the Oriental Variety are established and thriving, theyʼll drop their own bulbs with no help from you.Caution

Tiger Lillies blooming this week in a Musselman's Lake backyard

Lilies blooming this week in a Musselman’s Lake backyard

Although both Oriental and Common WIldflower Lilies are extremely hardy and seldom suffer from insects or disease themselves, both may carry diseases that affect other lilies and flowering plants, so if you are going to transplant from a wild group, you might consider carefully washing their roots before bedding them in your soil.

These plants are also toxic to cats, who may vomit, demonstrate lethargy, even develop kidney failure from eating them. On the other hand, rabbits and deer find the orange flowers a delectable treat! To keep these wild animals from eating away at your prizes, or nibbling on other treats from your garden, try mixing a solution of 20% egg with about 80% water, and spraying this over your lilies. Deer and rabbits hate the smell of eggs!